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Monday, July 16, 2018

John Wayne's Only Horror Film: "Haunted Gold" (Warner Brothers, 1932) (video)




A small sub-genre of the western is the "horror western."

They're usually "old, dark house"-type mysteries with faux supernatural elements.

The young John Wayne made a single foray into this territory with 1932's HAUNTED GOLD.

His romantic interest is played by Sheila Terry.

The most badly-dated element is the stereotypical black character "Clarence", played by Blue Washington.

Standard horror film tropes include an old dark house with secret passageways...

...a graveyard...

...and a mysterious phantom.

But despite the spooky trappings, things are wrapped up in usual B-western style.


I neither own nor claim any rights to this material.  Just having some fun with it.  Thanks for watching!



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Sunday, July 15, 2018

Dwight Frye's 5 Most Unhinged Horror Movie Creeps (video)




Dwight Frye dreamt of someday returning to musical comedy, which he'd performed for years on the Broadway stage.

But this was not to be once he became typecast as one of the screen's leading loons.

Here's are five examples of this...

Dracula (1931)
Frankenstein (1931)
Vampire Bat (1933)
Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
Dead Men Walk (1943)


Dwight Frye died shortly after being cast in a screen biography of Woodrow Wilson.

At the time, he was working as a draftsman for the Lockheed Aircraft Company.

On the death certificate, his profession was listed as "tool designer."

But it is in the horror film where he is truly immortalized.


I neither own nor claim any rights to this material.  Just having some fun with it.  Thanks for watching!



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Saturday, July 14, 2018

Was Billy Barty in "Bride of Frankenstein" (1935)? (video)




In "Bride of Frankenstein", the mad Dr. Pretorius shows off his strange miniature creations to Henry Frankenstein.

There's a queen, a king, an archbishop, a devil, a ballerina, and a mermaid.

But he didn't stop there...not originally, anyway.

Because director James Whale also filmed a bit with famed 3-foot 9-inch "little person" Billy Barty…

...as a tiny artificially-created baby in a high chair.

And in a wide shot of all of Dr. Pretorius' creations...

...you can see Billy in his high chair from behind, waving happily. 


I neither own nor claim any rights to this material.  Just having some fun with it.  Thanks for watching!



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Friday, July 13, 2018

Did Superman Really Duck When An Empty Gun Was Thrown At Him? (video)




In "The Mind Machine" (S1/E8) bullets don't faze Superman.

But when the bad guy throws his gun...

Later, though, in "Czar of the Underworld" (S1/E22), not only does he NOT duck...

...he even seems to enjoy it!


I neither own nor claim any rights to this material.  Just having some fun with it.  Thanks for watching!





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Thursday, July 12, 2018

"GOOSEBUMPS 2: HAUNTED HALLOWEEN" Teaser Trailer and Photos Here!



GOOSEBUMPS 2: HAUNTED HALLOWEEN
Comedy
October 12, 2018


Columbia Pictures: A Sony Company
Sony Pictures Animation

Halloween comes to life in a brand-new comedy adventure based on R.L. Stine’s 400-million-selling series of books.

WATCH THE TRAILER:



Directed by: Ari Sandel
Written by:     Rob Lieber 
Based on the Goosebumps Books
Written by:      R. L. Stine

Produced by: Deborah Forte
Neal H. Moritz
Executive Producers: Timothy M. Bourne
Tania Landau

Cast:       Wendi McLendon-Covey
Madison Iseman
Jeremy Ray Taylor
Caleel Harris
Chris Parnell
Ken Jeong


This film is not yet rated by the Motion Picture Association of America.  For future rating information, please visit www.filmratings.com.  Credits not final

GOOSEBUMPS and associated logos are trademarks of Scholastic Inc.  All Rights Reserved.



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The Frankenstein Monster's Mysterious Beauty Mark (Universal, 1931-1948) (video)




When Karloff played the Frankenstein monster in the 1930s, makeup maestro Jack Pierce emphasized his cadaverous appearance.

To this end, Karloff would remove a dental bridge on the right side of his mouth and suck in his cheek.
This created a sunken indentation in his face that added to his gaunt look.

With his third Monster appearance in "Son of Frankenstein", Karloff was looking a bit more well-fed.
The indentation is almost gone, replaced by a faint black dot, or "beauty mark."

Subsequent actors in the Monster role also had considerably fuller faces, with no cheek indentation.
The black dot returns, faintly, when Lon Chaney stars in "Ghost of Frankenstein."

It's more pronounced on Bela Lugosi in "Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man."
And on Glenn Strange in "House of Frankenstein."

But in "House of Dracula" and "Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein"...
...the Monster's mysterious "beauty mark" finally seems to be fading away for good.


I neither own nor claim any rights to this material.  Just having some fun with it.  Thanks for watching!



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