HK and Cult Film News's Fan Box

Sunday, January 31, 2016

THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE -- Movie Review by Porfle



With the epic outdoor action-drama THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE (1948), based on a novel by enigmatic writer B. Traven, Humphrey Bogart once again joined with director John Huston and his father Walter (after THE MALTESE FALCON) for a grueling tale of the devastating effects of greed on average men.  And during the film's arduous shoot in the wilds of Mexico, any hint of Hollywood glamour would soon become a distant memory. 

As Fred C. Dobbs, Bogart loses himself in one of his grittiest and least sympathetic roles.  Dobbs is an American stuck in a small Mexican town with no job or money, wandering the streets and begging for pesos.  (The younger Huston has a funny cameo as a well-to-do man Dobbs keeps hitting up for change.)  Dobbs will fling his glass of water in the face of a small boy (Robert Blake) pestering him to buy a lottery ticket, yet we sense a modicum of decency somewhere beneath his gruff exterior.

This early sequence of him trudging his way through life, getting bad haircuts, chasing after prostitutes, etc. lets us sit back and watch Bogart at work creating one of his finest characters.  Dobbs hooks up with a fellow American named Curtin (Tim Holt) for a job in which they're cheated out of their pay by a crooked foreman (Barton MacLane of THE MALTESE FALCON) whom they beat senseless after he attacks them in a bar.  (This well-choreographed fight scene is brutally effective.)  Then, after meeting grizzled old prospector Howard (Walter Huston) in a flophouse, they take his advice and set out with him to find gold in the mountains of the Mexican desert. 


Walter Huston enjoyed recounting the story of how he told his son John that if he ever became a filmmaker to "write me a good part."   The old gold-hunter Howard is that part, a role the elder Huston,  sans dentures, inhabits so fully that he almost manages to steal the picture right out from under Bogart.  (He would go on to win an Oscar for it.)  Howard is a goodnatured, level-headed old man, and we believe him when he warns of the evil effects gold can have on weak-willed men.
  
Dobbs blusters against such talk, thinking himself above any negative influences.  Yet without missing a beat, he will fulfill each of Howard's admonitions one by one as the lure of gold transforms him into a paranoid,  resentful,  and ultimately dangerous man.  By the time he's gone over the deep end, he's a frightening character, convinced in his mindless desperation that everyone's out to get him and that he's justified in whatever heinous act he may commit to protect himself and his newfound fortune.

When Dobbs and Curtin finally find themselves locked in a life-or-death battle of wills in the middle of the desert, the film almost takes on the eerie inevitability of a horror movie.  The only thing that undercuts it, along with much of the rest of the film, is one of Max Steiner's worst musical themes--a loping, folksy motif that I find jarringly out of place.


In addition to being a fascinating character study,  TREASURE is a terrific action-adventure.  Alfonso Bedoya is unforgettable as the ruthless Mexican bandit Gold Hat,  whose gang attacks our heroes' train during their trip into the mountains and then later stumbles upon their mining camp, leading to a blazing gunfight.  Gold Hat may be a monster, but Bedoya manages to make him funny, especially with his immortal response to Dobbs' question "If you're federales, where are your badges?"

"Badges? We ain’t got no badges...we don’t need no badges...I don’t have to show you any stinking badges!"

Tim Holt is solid in the less flashy role  of sturdy, dependable Curtin, who shares Howard's dismay at Dobbs' growing instability.  Walter Huston is a delight in a truly wonderful performance--he even gets to break the fourth wall and give us a sly look during one sequence in which he's being given the royal treatment by a tribe of Indians after doing them a good turn.  We don't even hold it against Howard when he votes along with the others to execute another man, Cody (Bruce Bennett), who tries to horn in on their find. 

But it's Bogart, as a man susceptible to bouts of pure, wild-eyed insanity, who makes the film as truly memorable as it is.  No matter how low he sinks and what horrible things he does, we always remember the relatively decent guy he was before gold changed him, and feel some remorse for what he's become.  And just like Dobbs, I'd like to think gold wouldn't make me act that way--but who knows?

Read our review of the BEST OF BOGART COLLECTION


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Saturday, January 30, 2016

THE MALTESE FALCON (1941) -- Movie Review by Porfle



The first great "film noir", 1941's THE MALTESE FALCON, set the standard both storywise and in its impeccably exquisite visuals.  First-time director John Huston does a masterful job orchestrating his actors and crew to create a visual experience which is consistently involving and often dazzling. 

The film, shot mostly on interior sets, was brought in on budget and ahead of schedule despite Huston requesting an extra day of rehearsal for the film's climactic sequence, which takes place entirely within a single hotel room with almost all members of the main cast.  The complex character interactions and the way the tangled plot is meticulously resolved during this scene makes for some of the most breathlessly riveting cinema ever filmed.

Huston uses clever direction and camera movements to keep things from getting claustrophobic, and never once lets the pace drag.  His screenplay follows Dashiell Hammett's novel almost to the letter (the two earlier, inferior adaptations, 1931's "Dangerous Female" and the comedic "Satan Met a Lady" in 1936, didn't), and crackles with scintillating dialogue, intriguing plot twists, and relentlessly building suspense. 


Hammett's celebrated anti-hero Sam Spade is the perfect noir detective--brash, resourceful, self-assured, keenly intelligent, streetwise, tough but not infallible, and opportunistic.  He does have a moral code, one not easily compromised, and a motto that is rigidly enforced: "Never play the sap for anyone." 

The first person to try and use him is quintessential femme fatale Brigid O'Shaughnessy (exquisitely  played by Mary Astor), who hires San Francisco private detective Spade and his partner Miles Archer (Jerome Cowan) to locate her missing sister along with a mystery man named Floyd Thursby.  When both Archer and Thursby turn up dead, it appears there's more to Brigid's story than she's letting on. 

Before long Spade discovers that she's after a priceless treasure known as the Maltese Falcon, for which she's in fierce competition against  "the Fat Man" Kaspar Gutman (Sydney Greenstreet) and the wily, effeminate Joel Cairo (Peter Lorre).  Spade must spar with these conniving characters while fending off police detectives Dundy and Polhaus (Barton MacLane, Ward Bond), who suspect him in the murders although the more genial Polhaus tends to side with Sam.  All in all, these actors comprise one of the finest casts ever assembled for a film.  (Look for John Huston's father Walter in a quick cameo as a fatally wounded ship's captain.)


Huston delights in working with these masterful performers as any artist deftly employs his chosen medium.  The dialogue scenes between Bogart and Greenstreet are a verbal delight (Gutman constantly admits his glowing admiration for the crafty Spade), while the utter dishonesty underlying Spade's love affair with Brigid gives it an air of perversion. 

Lorre's Joel Cairo, both dangerously scheming and amusingly fussy, is always fun to watch.  I love the scene in which Spade disarms and manhandles Cairo, whose main concern is expressed with the heated accusation: "Look what you did to my shirt!"

Even young character actor Elisha Cook, Jr. gets to shine in the plum role of Gutman's "gunsel" Wilmer Cook, a callow trench-coated hood hiding his cowardice behind guns and tough talk.  (Dwight Frye played the part in the 1931 version.)  The ever-sharper Spade delights in yanking Wilmer's chain, and in one incredible closeup we see fat, glistening tears suspended in each of the young killer's eyes as he's overcome with burning frustration and impotent rage (another bravura touch by Huston).


But it's Bogart's show, and his performance is a pure delight.  We know Spade's a stand-up guy, yet the moment his partner's murdered he has the signs around the office changed from "Spade and Archer" to "Samuel Spade."  He's even having an affair with Archer's wife, Iva (Gladys George), but loses interest once he meets Miss O'Shaughnessy.  Yet we know he's an okay guy as long as his faithful gal Friday, Effie (Lee Patrick), still secretly loves him. 

In one delightful moment, after storming out of a tense encounter with Gutman and Wilmer in the Fat Man's swanky hotel room, Spade smiles when he realizes that his hand is shaking and his palms sweating.  Spade may be brave, but he still gets scared, a fact which both amuses and excites him.

This vintage detective yarn sizzles with suspense and excitement for viewers who are able to plug themselves into its high-voltage current.  For me, it took several viewings before I finally began to appreciate just what a finely-rendered thing of beauty it truly is.  Others (as some IMDb comments would indicate) seem to take a strange kind of pride in remaining immune to its charms, believing that such classics are revered by many simply because they're "old." 

But if it doesn't hit you right away, just keep watching and remain open to it.  Chances are that sooner or later, THE MALTESE FALCON will weave its magic spell over you.  Like the rare and unique artifact of the title, it's "the stuff dreams are made of.

Read our review of the BEST OF BOGART COLLECTION


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Friday, January 29, 2016

THE COUNTRY GIRL -- Movie Review by Porfle



A busy year for Grace Kelly, 1954 would bring what was arguably her greatest success as an actress--namely, the Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of Georgie Elgin in director George Seaton's Best Picture contender THE COUNTRY GIRL.

Bing Crosby snagged a Best Actor nomination as Georgie's alcoholic husband Frank. (The movie received seven nominations in all.)

William Holden (THE BRIDGES AT TOKO-RI) is back and bursting with energy in the role of Bernie Dodd, a hot-shot Broadway director who ignores his backers' misgivings by wanting to hire the washed-up Frank for the lead role in a new musical despite his potential unreliability.


After a successful audition, insecure Frank disappears when he discovers he's up for the pivotal part instead of a simple supporting role. Bernie tracks him down to convince him that he can handle it--but can he?

As Frankie's mousey wife Georgie, Grace Kelly gains extra critical cred by toning the glamour dial way down. In fact, she's probably as close to "dowdy" here as the future Princess of Monaco could possibly get without going full Jane Hathaway. (Bernie evens chides Georgie for trying too hard to look plain.)

Since their young son (a pre-"Lassie" Jon Provost) was killed while in Frank's care, the distraught dad has been on a downward spiral that Georgie's tried her best to stop even if it means overly protecting him to the point of being domineering, of which Bernie accuses her.


When the play's early notices aren't exactly glowing and Frank starts hitting the bottle again, it becomes apparent to Bernie that Georgie's influence over her husband may have been more crucial than he suspected.

Not only that, but more secrets about Frank's past come to light which convince Bernie he's got a much bigger problem on his hands than he ever imagined.

Grace not only holds her own next to both Holden and a very effective Crosby, but spars expertly with them in several emotionally-charged exchanges that really give her acting skills a workout.


Any reservations I might've had about her getting by mainly on girlish good looks and an elegant charm are put to rest watching her make the most of this demanding role. One thing's for sure after the fadeout--she deserved that Oscar.

THE COUNTRY GIRL skirts the line between pathos and bathos and ends up just on the right side of it with a satisfying conclusion which rewards our emotional investment in it. 

Read our review of the GRACE KELLY COLLECTION




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Thursday, January 28, 2016

"CABIN FEVER" Reboot From Producer Eli Roth Opening February 12th



IFC MIDNIGHT
Presents

CABIN FEVER

A Film By Travis Zariwny
Executive Produced By Eli Roth

IN THEATERS FEBRUARY 12TH NEW YORK & LOS ANGELES


Executive producer Eli Roth presents this reboot of his instant classic gorefest, which features all new characters and all new kills.

This story is familiar: fresh out of college, a group of five friends retreat to a remote cabin in the woods for one last week of partying- only to become snacks for a gruesome, flesh-eating virus.

What’s surprising are the ingenious new deaths, which offer a fresh spin on a horror-comedy milestone.

With Gage Golightly (Teen Wolf) and Dustin Ingram (Paranormal Activity 3).

Directed by: Travis Zariwny

Executive Produced by: Eli Roth

Starring: Gage Golightly, Dustin Ingram, Nadine Crocker, Matthew Daddario & Samuel Davis



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SPECTRE/"WRITING'S ON THE WALL" Opening Sequence (with Sam Smith) -- Watch It Here Now



As Academy members consider the nominations in the category of Best Original Song, audiences can now experience "Writing's on the Wall," music and lyrics by Sam Smith & Jimmy Napes, as it was meant to be heard - along with the striking visuals of the title sequence to SPECTRE. 

Critics' Choice Nominee and Golden Globe Winner "Writing's on the Wall" is the first Bond theme song in the history of the franchise to reach #1 on UK singles charts in its first week of release.


A cryptic message from the past sends James Bond (Daniel Craig) on a rogue mission to Mexico City and eventually Rome, where he meets Lucia Sciarra (Monica Bellucci), the beautiful and forbidden widow of an infamous criminal.  Bond infiltrates a secret meeting and uncovers the existence of the sinister organisation known as SPECTRE.

Meanwhile back in London, Max Denbigh (Andrew Scott), the new head of the Centre for National Security, questions Bond's actions and challenges the relevance of MI6, led by M (Ralph Fiennes). Bond covertly enlists Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) and Q (Ben Whishaw) to help him seek out Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), the daughter of his old nemesis Mr White (Jesper Christensen), who may hold the clue to untangling the web of SPECTRE. As the daughter of an assassin, she understands Bond in a way most others cannot.

As Bond ventures towards the heart of SPECTRE, he learns of a chilling connection between himself and the enemy he seeks, played by Christoph Waltz.

SPECTRE, from Albert R. Broccoli's EON Productions, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, and Sony Pictures Entertainment, is directed by Sam Mendes, with Daniel Craig reprising his role as 007 for the fourth time.  SPECTRE is produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli.  The screenplay is by John Logan and Neal Purvis & Robert Wade and Jez Butterworth, with a story by John Logan and Neal Purvis & Robert Wade.




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DIAL M FOR MURDER -- Movie Review by Porfle



Grace Kelly's first association with Alfred Hitchcock came in 1954 with DIAL M FOR MURDER, adapted by Frederick Knott from his own stage play.

The theatrical origins of the story are apparent since Hitchcock made little effort to hide them--indeed, he probably considered the limited locations (most of the action takes place in a single apartment) a challenge along the same lines as LIFEBOAT and ROPE.

Peter Bogdanovich relates that in directing the film Hitchcock didn't feel the need to "open it up" cinematically, fearing that this would interfere with the play's intricate construction.


And he finds enough with which to busy himself artistically to keep things visually interesting while briskly moving the dialogue-driven plot along--in particular, since the film was originally released in 3D, Hitchcock seems inspired to explore the possibilities of this novelty device without resorting to the more obvious gimmicks.

Ray Milland is at his slimy-smooth best as former tennis pro Tony Wendice, now living with wife Margot (Kelly) in a luxurius apartment in London.

The arrival of an old friend from the USA, Mark Halliday (Robert Cummings)--with whom Margot once had an affair--helps set into motion Tony's plan to murder Margot for her money and blame it on a blackmail scheme gone wrong.


To carry out the murder, Tony hires a cash-strapped con man named Lesgate (Anthony Dawson, who, as "Professor Dent", was famously executed by agent 007 in the first James Bond film, DR. NO).

Their lengthy dialogue scene in which Tony lays out his plan in intricate detail is talky, almost static, yet Hitchcock and his able cast manage to bring the script to vivid life as we hang on every word.

The actual murder scene is executed (so to speak) with exquisite suspense, helped in no small part by Grace Kelly's outstanding performance as the frantic victim.


Later, during the investigation, the introduction of a new character in the form of Chief Inspector Hubbard (John Williams, whom many baby-boomers will recognize as Sebastian Cabot's replacement in the TV series "Family Affair") turns this suspense thriller into a crackerjack investigative procedural reminiscent of "Columbo" in that the actual culprit arrogantly underestimates the detective.

The resulting cat-and-mouse game of wits makes DIAL M FOR MURDER one to savor.

Read our review of the GRACE KELLY COLLECTION




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Wednesday, January 27, 2016

THE BRIDGES AT TOKO-RI -- Movie Review by Porfle



Director Mark Robson's THE BRIDGES AT TOKO-RI (1954) finds Grace Kelly in a role which barely gives her enough screen time to make an impression. She plays Nancy, the wife of fighter pilot Lt. Harry Brubaker (William Holden), currently assigned to an aircraft carrier in order to help fight the Korean War.

Nancy brings their two daughters to Tokyo to meet the carrier when it docks and give Harry a pleasant surprise, but their romantic reunion is interrupted when he must leave to rescue buddies Mickey Rooney and Earl Holliman (who saved Harry's life that very day when his jet went down in the freezing ocean) after the two helicopter jockeys land in the brig.

With little to do otherwise, Grace's best moment in the film is when her family ends up bathing nude with a Japanese family (as per local custom) and the result is a charming intermingling of disparate cultures.


Grace gets second billing here but it really belongs to Fredric March (THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES) as Rear Admiral Tarrant, who takes an interest in Harry since the young pilot reminds him of his son who was killed in WWII.

March is excellent portraying the wisdom and compassion of an officer with the responsibility of sending Harry and his fellow pilots on a highly dangerous mission to knock out the titular target (which could hasten the end of the war) while agonizing over their possible fate.

This film was produced during that magical Hollywood era when they could still make war pictures that were stirring and patriotic (instead of cynical and downbeat) while still exploring the human side of the soldiers involved--particularly their psychology and that of their loved ones, often encompassing feelings of disillusionment and isolation, with even a little existentialism thrown in.



"Militarily, this war is a tragedy" Admiral Tarrant laments at one point, while Brubaker (nicely played by a vibrant young Holden) feels cheated that this new war has forced him to give up the life he'd begun to forge after having already served in WWII.

Rooney and Holliman, two of my favorite actors, also give solid performances as the intrepid helicopter rescuers. They figure prominently in the film's exciting conclusion which, after some tense action aboard the aircraft carrier, comes to a head during the final thrilling raid on Toko-Ri.

This sequence is loaded with incredible aerial footage and top-notch special effects (reminiscent, I thought, of the rebel fighters' attack on the Death Star in STAR WARS) and is topped by a harrowing firefight on the ground in which the lives of our heroes are in grave jeopardy.

THE BRIDGES AT TOKO-RI may not be one of the all-time greatest of war films, but it's a solid, affecting effort that should remain in your memory for some time.

Read our review of the GRACE KELLY COLLECTION


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"HOTEL INFERNO" -- The World's First POV Action Horror Film Releases New Art and Stills









Hotel Inferno Puts You Into the Carnage
First POV Action Horror Film Teases New Art & Stills

   
New York, NY - WildEye Releasing immerses fans into a first-person apocalypse when Giulio De Santi's Hotel Inferno makes its North American debut this June.  Follow a contract killer on the job as the hunter becomes the hunted of demonic monsters in new key art and stills.

Hitman Frank Zimosa is hired for a lucrative mission by a rich client. The objective: kill two people in a hotel. But this simple job soon becomes a nightmare as an army of insane henchmen and monsters are waiting for him, all under the control of an ancient and unstoppable demon - now Frank must fight his way out with any weapon he can get his hands on.

Hotel Inferno will be available stateside Summer 2016.








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Tuesday, January 26, 2016

MOGAMBO -- Movie Review by Porfle



In MOGAMBO (1953), Grace Kelly's third film (for which she received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in a Supporting Role), she plays Linda Nordley, the timid, pampered wife of anthropologist Donald (Donald Sinden), with whom she has traveled to the wilds of Africa in search of gorillas to study.

Their guide is a rough, uncouth big-game hunter named Vic Marswell (an aging but still great Clark Gable) who traps animals for circuses and zoos.

Vic is currently semi-involved with the darkly beautiful Eloise Y. Kelly (a gorgeous young Ava Gardner), a soiled-dove city gal marooned in Vic's wilderness compound after being dumped there by a duplicitious maharajah.


But the arrival of the Nordleys creates a heated love triangle between Vic, Eloise, and the unhappy-in-marriage Linda--whose skittish vulnerability prompts burly Vic to become hopelessly smitten--turning their gorilla-country expedition into a jungle soap opera.

Along with the slow-moving and only mildly engaging melodrama, virtuoso director John Ford gives us plenty of breathtaking African scenery in glorious Technicolor.

Authentic African tribespeople and locations lend the production an air of authenticity that helps offset the hokey "forbidden love" story, as does our simple enjoyment in watching the appealing Gable and Gardner injecting a little life into things.


Grace Kelly, meanwhile, inhabits her flighty character to a tee, which viewers will probably find either endearing or annoying. Your reaction to this remake of the 1932 Clark Gable-Jean Harlow film RED DUST may fall along similar lines.

Personally, I prefer the similarly-themed Howard Hawks comedy-adventure HATARI!, but found MOGAMBO to be a passable time-waster which, thanks to Africa and Ava, looks terrific. Gable and Kelly, however, are hardly a romantic screen couple for the ages.

Read our review of the GRACE KELLY COLLECTION





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"THE FINEST HOURS" Trailer -- Fact-Based Maritime Thriller In Theaters January 29, 2016





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Monday, January 25, 2016

HIGH SOCIETY -- Movie Review by Porfle



Wrapping up Grace Kelly's career in fine style is her final film, HIGH SOCIETY (1956), MGM's musical remake of THE PHILADELPHIA STORY which starred Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and James Stewart.

The film was rushed into production since Grace was already preparing to marry Prince Rainier and leave showbiz forever, and her cinematic swan song ended up breaking box office records upon release.

As "Tracy Lord", Grace is back to being a pampered rich girl, only moreso--she's on pins and needles planning her upcoming wedding to some stiff named George Kittredge (John Lund) whom we know doesn't have a chance in hell because Tracy's cutely tomboyish li'l sister Caroline (Lydia Reed, pretty much a Virginia Weidler clone) doesn't like him and prefers Tracy's easygoing ex-husband C.K. Dexter-Haven, or "Dexter" (Bing Crosby), whom Tracy rejected because, among other negligible reasons, he chooses that awful lowbrow jazz over serious music.

 

One of those hyperactive romantic comedies brimming with "comic complications", HIGH SOCIETY tries so hard to be lighthearted it tends to be lightheaded at some times, and turgid at others.

Bing, of course, comes off as smooth as molasses and just as thick--it's fun watching him try to be "breezy." He does have that voice, though, and we can't blame even the great Louie "Satchmo" Armstrong (he and his band serve as the story's Greek chorus) for wanting to jam along with it.

Grace, meanwhile, has that coltish quality Peter Bogdanovich was aiming for when he cast Cybill Shepherd in AT LONG LAST LOVE (although in Cybill's case the word "horsey" might be more apt), breathlessly reciting wisecracks and pithy exclamations while hitting all her marks as though running the bases. She isn't quite "funny" as much as she's simply formidable, although when things veer more toward the dramatic she handles herself with aplomb.


Helping to round out the stellar cast are Frank Sinatra and Celeste Holm as correspondents for a cheap gossip rag who've been allowed to cover the wedding lest a damning story about Tracy's father Seth (Sidney Blackmer) be printed. They, too, are obviously meant to be together, so of course Frank will fall for Tracy while Celeste fends off the advances of Tracy's elderly Uncle Willie (Louis Calhern).

In turns amusing and tiresome, HIGH SOCIETY is a harmless way to pass some time in between worthwhile moments such as Bing and Grace dueting on "True Love", the hit song that earned them both gold records. The Cole Porter score itself isn't one of his most stellar achievements--the song and dance interludes seem rather shoehorned in at times--but it's kind of fun anyway. The same can be said for the film as a whole.

Read our review of the GRACE KELLY COLLECTION



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Sunday, January 24, 2016

ELMO'S WORLD: ELMO WONDERS -- DVD Review by Porfle



Elmo's back, and this time he has a whole DVD to himself.  Which gives him plenty of time to do what he does best--wonder about things.

ELMO'S WORLD: ELMO WONDERS features eight full episodes (approx. two hours) of our li'l furry friend wondering about the mysteries of the world that have puzzled preschoolers since the dawn of time.  Less segmented and random than "Sesame Street", "Elmo's World" is designed for smaller tykes who haven't reached that level of sophistication and are still dealing with Life 101. 

In other words, very little emphasis on letters and numbers and more upon things like jumping, mailing letters, and how to ride bicycles.


Elmo chooses a subject at the outset of each episode and exhaustively investigates it through a series of recurring vignettes that benefit both from his own innocent charm and a wealth of colorfully-rendered cartoon and live-action images.  He's aided by his beloved goldfish Dorothy, who is silent but with whom Elmo seems to share a psychic bond, along with a host of children who comment, both on and off camera, on the proceedings throughout. 

Also on hand to help demonstrate things in the most clueless ways possible is comedian Bill Irwin as "Mr. Noodle", Elmo's next-door neighbor and a comical idiot of the highest order.  In each episode we see him through Elmo's window as he does everything from attempting to row a canoe on dry land to mailing a letter by throwing it through a basketball hoop while the offscreen kids egg him on. 

The late, great Michael Jeter (THE GREEN MILE) shows up in one episode as Mr. Noodle's brother, Mr. Noodle, demonstrating how not to ride a bicycle (sitting backwards on it, we learn, is impractical) while their dumb-blonde sister Miss Noodle models inappropriate ways to dress while firefighting.


Elmo himself has a boundless energy and an inquisitive enthusiasm for everything that's infectious.  In the tradition of Captain Kangaroo and Soupy Sales, he interacts with various inanimate objects such as drawers, window shades, and doors which are alive and often tax his patience with their comical obstinance ("Come on, Shade--stay up!") 

Regular Sesame Street characters such as Big Bird, Cookie Monster, and Oscar the Grouch frequently drop in or send Elmo video messages which he views on his computer whenever he can pin the rambunctious critter down long enough. 

His TV, which also skitters about and turns itself on and off, has a channel devoted to every subject ("The Sky Channel", "The Doctor Channel", and yes, even "The Weather Channel") featuring a character named The Lecture Lady who is usually voiced by the great SCTV alumnus Andrea Martin in "Edith Prickley" mode.


Dorothy the goldfish keeps up her end of the show by imagining Elmo in various guises (in the "Doctor" episode she pictures him as a vet asking a whale to say "Ahhh", while in "Firefighters" he rescues a kitty cat from a tree) and by telepathically asking pertinent questions to which Elmo endeavors to find the answers. 

Each show ends with Dorothy requesting a song which invariably consists of Elmo singing a single word ("doctors", "weather", "sky", etc.) over and over to the tune of "Jingle Bells" while plunking his giant kiddie piano with whatever humans and/or muppets happen to be on hand as his backup singers.

The DVD from Warner Brothers Home Entertainment is full screen and contains seven complete episodes of "Elmo's World" plus a bonus episode ("Transportation") and Ernie of "Bert and Ernie" fame singing the "I Wonder" song. 

By Sesame Street standards, ELMOS'S WORLD: ELMO WONDERS is refreshingly low-key, without the usual breakneck pace designed to keep low-attention-span kids' minds from wandering.  With Elmo scampering about inside his delightful crayon-scrawled world and seeing everything through the eyes of a curious preschooler, it's the kind of children's show that Pee-Wee Herman himself might watch to connect with his inner child's inner child.


Buy it at the WBShop.com




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Friday, January 22, 2016

"EXPOSED" Trailer -- Keanu Reeves Stars in Cop Thriller with Ana de Armas and Mira Sorvino



EXPOSED
LIONSGATE PREMIERE


A police detective investigates the truth behind his partner’s death. The mysterious case reveals disturbing police corruption and a dangerous secret involving an unlikely young woman.

EXPOSED stars Ana de Armas, Keanu Reeves, Christopher McDonald, Big Daddy Kane and Mira Sorvino. Lionsgate Premiere will release the crime thriller in theaters and On Demand on January 22nd.

Lionsgate Premiere, Grindstone Entertainment Group and Emmett Furla Oasis Films present in association with Elevated Films and Fortitude International in association with PalmStar Media, a Company Films production.


Genre:                 Thriller                   
Rating:        Rated R for violence including a sexual assault, and for language
U.S. Release Date:         January 22, 2016 (In Theaters and On Demand)   
Run Time:            120 minutes   

Cast:    Ana de Armas (Isabel De La Cruz), Keanu Reeves (Detective Galban), Christopher McDonald (Lieutenant Galway), Big Daddy Kane (Jonathan "Black" Jones), Venus Ariel (Elisa), Michael Rispoli (Detective Dibronski), Gabriel Vargas (Manuel "Rocky" De La Cruz), Laura Gomez (Eva De La Cruz), Ismael Cruz Córdova (Jose De La Cruz), Jeanette Dilone (Marisol De La Cruz), Denia Brache (Gloria De La Cruz), Ariel Rolando Pacheco (Naldo), Melissa Cardello Linton (Detective Ramirez) and Mira Sorvino (Janine Cullen)

Directed by:    Declan Dale
Written by:    Gee Malik Linton   
Produced by:     Robin Gurland, Keanu Reeves, Gee Malik Linton   
Director of Photography:    Trevor Forrest
Production Designer:    Tania Bijlani
Editor:    Melody London
Music by:    Carlos José Alvarez
Costume Designer:     Amela Baksic
Casting by:    Ellyn Long Marshall and Maria E. Nelson
Vocal Solos by:    Janet Dacal

Executive Producers:    Cassian Elwes, Katie Mustard, Elie Samaha, Randall Emmett, George Furla, Barry Brooker, Stan Wertlieb, Nadine de Barros, Robert Ogden Barnum, Ike Suri, Jaclyn Ann Suri, Kevin Frakes, Buddy Patrick, Ankur Rungta, Scott Fischer, Galt Niederhoffer, Dan Grodnik, Seth Kramer, Curt Kramer
               


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CASABLANCA -- Movie Review by Porfle


CASABLANCA (1942) is one of those films which we can now look back on as an undisputed classic in which everything seems to come together perfectly.  At the time, however, it was regarded by the studio as just another production, whose script, based on the unproduced play "Everyone Comes to Rick's", was being written on the fly and didn't even have a proper ending worked out until shortly before it was shot.

 The story takes place in 1942 in the Vichy-controlled Moroccan city of Casablanca, which overflows with refugees desperately struggling to gain passage to America and elsewhere in the free world to escape Nazi encroachment in Europe .  Exiled American (and ex-freedom fighter) Rick Blaine, played to perfection by Bogart , runs a nightclub called "Rick's Café Américain" in which many of these people meet to buy and sell the hope for freedom. 

 Also on hand is Rick's friend, Captain Louis Renault (THE INVISIBLE MAN's Claude Rains in one of his best performances), the head of the local police and an opportunist of the first order whose greatest pleasure is accepting bribes both monetary and sexual.  Renault openly admires Rick's similarly self-serving qualities and even displays a platonic crush on him ("If I were a woman, and I were not around, I should be in love with Rick," he admits). 



We wonder how Renault would react if Rick started reverting back to his old, noble self, especially in the presence of the vile German officer Major Heinrich Strasser (Conrad Veidt, THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI,  THE MAN WHO LAUGHS), newly-arrived and on the trail of famed Czech resistance leader Victor Laszlo (Paul Henried). 

 While Rick starts out as an anti-hero, he gradually and without really meaning to becomes more heroic as the story progresses.  Early on, Peter Lorre's oily Ugarte--who recently killed some German soldiers to attain two letters of transit to sell in Casablanca--begs Rick for help before he's captured ("Hide me, Rick!  Hide me!").  Rick's terse response: "I stick my neck out for nobody." 

And indeed, Rick seems grudgingly content to sit out the current world war as manager of his bustling nightclub until one night, when an old flame named Ilsa (the utterly radiant Ingrid Bergman) comes through the front door with her husband, none other than Victor Laszlo.  Rick, once an idealistic crusader himself but now cynical and disillusioned, has never forgiven Ilsa for inexplicably running out on him during the fall of Paris, at the height of their love affair--not knowing that Laszlo, whom they both thought dead, had turned up alive.


 When Rick obtains the two letters of transit from Ugarte, he has the means of whisking Ilsa back to America with him and resuming their love affair while leaving Laszlo behind to carry on alone and devastated.  But will he do something so selfish and immoral?  Or regain his soul and commit the supreme act of sacrifice for the sake not only of Ilsa and her husband but of the free world itself?

 This is the dilemma which gives CASABLANCA much of its power to effect us emotionally while simmering with a growing suspense.  As a film, everything clicks-- Michael Curtiz' sharp direction, the gorgeous black-and-white photography, great performances by a stellar cast, a powerful musical score by Max Steiner, and a story that's always totally engaging. 

 Action and romance are perfectly balanced and compliment each other, while comedic touches abound, especially from the delightfully corruptible Renault,  the antics of Rick's eccentric staff (including S.Z. Sakall), and a fez-topped Sydney Greenstreet (again) as a competing club owner who wants to acquire Rick's place along with his loyal piano-playing band leader Sam (Dooley Wilson, who croons the classic "As Time Goes By").




But when Laszlo exhorts Sam and his band to strike up a stirring rendition of "La Marseillaise" in response to Strasser and his fellow German officers belting out "Die Wacht am Rhein", the move (which Rick okays with a subtle nod of his head) not only stirs the patriotic fervor of everyone else in the club but may bring the viewer to tears as well.  (Steiner uses this same anthem as a fanfare for his own musical credit during the main titles.)

The climax of the film takes place at the airport, a focal point for dreams of freedom throughout the story.  Rick now literally holds the ticket to a new life with Ilsa, who will join him if he asks her to.  Yet his newly reawakened sense of duty to humanity now fights for precedence.  Meanwhile Renault, his own duty to Strasser  putting him at odds with his friend, awaits Rick's decision. 

 When the plane fires up its engines, Steiner's music swells, and there comes a stunning, perfectly-edited series of  closeups of Bogart,  Bergman, and Henried which generate a dramatic tension few films could ever attain.  It's pure, undiluted Hollywood magic at its most sublime, and the resolution which follows couldn't be more perfect.  CASABLANCA is an intricate jigsaw puzzle of seemingly disparate pieces which fit together to form a beautiful picture.

Read our review of THE BEST OF BOGART COLLECTION





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Thursday, January 21, 2016

Rob Cohen To Direct “CATEGORY 5” For Foresight Unlimited



ROB COHEN TO DIRECT “CATEGORY 5” FOR
FORESIGHT UNLIMITED

Sales to Commence in Berlin on the Disaster Action Thriller


Los Angeles, CA (January 20, 2016) – Foresight Unlimited announced today that Rob Cohen (The Fast and the Furious) will direct the upcoming disaster action thriller “Category 5”.

With production slated for Spring/Summer 2016, “Category 5” follows a team of tech hackers who infiltrate a U.S. Mint facility on a small coastal town to steal $102M in cash, just as a disastrous Category 5 hurricane, the storm of the century, is about to strike and level it to the ground. The only other two people left in the town, a meteorologist and a female treasury agent, must survive the horrific storm while stopping the thieves from getting away with the heist of the century.

Foresight Unlimited will handle foreign sales and introduce the film to buyers in Berlin next month. Casting is currently underway.

The film will be produced by Karen Baldwin, Michael Tadross Jr., and Danny Roth. Howard Baldwin, Mark Damon, Bill Immerman and Tamara Birkemoe will executive produce.

Director Rob Cohen said: “Crossing a heist movie set amidst the intense action of a natural disaster was an idea to which I truly responded. It’s a chance for me to get back to my roots in doing the adrenaline-pumped action/special effects films I love to create.”

Foresight’s Mark Damon said: “Rob Cohen is an incredibly smart and inventive action director and we are delighted to be part of “Category 5”. Windhauser’s script details an extraordinary race against the elements, which we are confident, with Cohen’s vision, will be a breathtaking adventure for audiences worldwide.”

Cohen takes on the action-film having risen to prominence through previous directorial roles including “The Fast and the Furious” starring Vin Diesel and “The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor” starring Brendan Fraser for Universal; “xXx” starring Vin Diesel for Columbia Pictures; and “Alex Cross” starring Tyler Perry for Summit Entertainment.  He most recently directed “The Boy Next Door” starring Jennifer Lopez for Universal Pictures, and will direct “The Adventures of Marco Polo” for Jerry Bruckheimer and Chad Oman at Paramount Pictures.

Cohen is represented by Rob Carlson, WME and Craig Baumgarten of Link Management, and Michael Schenkman, attorney at Bloom, Hergott.

The Foresight Unlimited slate includes: the Neil Bogart biopic Spinning Gold starring Emmy® and Grammy Award® winner Justin Timberlake; the $130M sci-fi epic “Inversion”, and Bobby Farrelly’s “One Night Stan”.

About Foresight Unlimited
 
Foresight Unlimited is one of the industry’s leading independent film production, sales, and distribution companies.  With a pioneering entertainment career spanning over 50 years, CEO, Mark Damon is considered to be one of the leading authorities on international film financing, distribution and marketing strategies as well as being a successful independent producer.

The company’s management group is helmed by President Tamara Birkemoe who oversees all aspects of the company’s slate with previous titles including box office hits such as “Lone Survivor” directed by Peter Berg and starring Mark Wahlberg, and “2 Guns” starring Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington.

Damon has produced and distributed such notable films as: Academy Award ® winner “Monster,” Academy Award® nominee “Das Boot,” “9 1/2 Weeks,” Once Upon a Time in America,” “The Never Ending Story,” “Never Say Never Again,” and “Lost Boys.”



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Wednesday, January 20, 2016

"Heroes Reborn: Event Series" On Blu-ray and DVD 4/12/2016



HEROES REBORN: EVENT SERIES
Release Date: 4/12/2016


Synopsis: Experience the epic 13-episode event series, Heroes Reborn, from Tim Kring, the creator of the global phenomenon, Heroes. Kring creates a wildly imaginative and thrilling new volume in the Heroes universe featuring a host of new characters with startling powers.

After a massive terrorist attack in Odessa, Texas, evolved humans are blamed for the tragic event, forcing them into hiding or on the run from those seeking retribution. The conflict between humans and evolved humans - dubbed "Evos" - escalates into all out civil warfare.

Timely, thought-provoking, and startling inventive, Heroes Reborn recaptures the magic of the original series and lays the foundation for the next volume in the Heroes mythology.

Blu-ray Widescreen TV Set(61166402) : Disc 1 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      Blu-ray      UPC:      0-2519-22717-7-9
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      2 Hours 54 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      BD-50 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
       Subtitles:      English SDH
French Canadian
Latin Spanish

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Widescreen
 Version:      Blu-ray + Digital HD      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:      • Includes UltraViolet (Subject to expiration. Go to NBCUCodes.com for details.)


Blu-ray Widescreen TV Set(61166402) : Disc 2 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      Blu-ray      UPC:      0-2519-22717-7-9
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      3 Hours 33 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      BD-50 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
       Subtitles:      English SDH
French Canadian
Latin Spanish

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Widescreen
 Version:      Blu-ray + Digital HD      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:     

Blu-ray Widescreen TV Set(61166402) : Disc 3 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      Blu-ray      UPC:      0-2519-22717-7-9
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      2 Hours 49 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      BD-50 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
       Subtitles:      English SDH
French Canadian
Latin Spanish

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Widescreen
 Version:      Blu-ray + Digital HD      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:      • Heroes Reborn: Reliving the Legacy
• Heroes Reborn: Dark Matters


DVD Widescreen TV Set(61166403) : Disc 1 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      DVD      UPC:      0-2519-22717-8-6
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      2 Hours 12 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      DVD-9 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround
       Subtitles:      English SDH
Spanish
French

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Anamorphic Widescreen
 Version:      -      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:     

DVD Widescreen TV Set(61166403) : Disc 2 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      DVD      UPC:      0-2519-22717-8-6
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      2 Hours 7 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      DVD-9 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround
       Subtitles:      English SDH
Spanish
French

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Anamorphic Widescreen
 Version:      -      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:     

DVD Widescreen TV Set(61166403) : Disc 3 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      DVD      UPC:      0-2519-22717-8-6
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      2 Hours 50 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      DVD-9 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround
       Subtitles:      English SDH
Spanish
French

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Anamorphic Widescreen
 Version:      -      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:     

DVD Widescreen TV Set(61166403) : Disc 4 (Side A): Heroes Reborn: Event Series
 Format:      DVD      UPC:      0-2519-22717-8-6
 Unit Type:      TV Set      Number of Media:      1
 Street Date:      4/12/2016      PreOrder Date:     
 Run Time (HH:MM):      2 Hours 8 Minutes          
 Language:      English      Disc Type:      DVD-9 (Single Sided)
 Packaging:      Snap Case with Slip Sleeve      Layers:      Single
 Audio:     English Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround
       Subtitles:      English SDH
Spanish
French

 Edition:      -      Picture:      Anamorphic Widescreen
 Version:      -      Color/B&W     COLOR
 Rating:      Not Rated      CARA Rating:      -
 Bonus Features:      • Heroes Reborn: Reliving the Legacy
• Heroes Reborn: Dark Matters



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Borderline Films Launches New Label for Exec. Production - BORDERLINE PRESENTS



NEW YORK, NY — Borderline Films, the filmmaking collective behind such critically acclaimed films as AFTERSCHOOL, MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE, SIMON KILLER, and JAMES WHITE, is launching a new label, Borderline Presents, under which founding members Josh Mond, Sean Durkin, and Antonio Campos will executive produce select projects. An expansion of their uniquely collaborative approach to filmmaking, the primary aim of Borderline Presents is to help filmmakers realize their vision.

"We started Borderline Films so that we had each other's support and felt safe making the films we wanted to make,” said Josh Mond on behalf of the group. “We've been fortunate enough to have all made our first feature and want to use our experience to provide that same kind of support to help other like minded filmmakers, whether they be our contemporaries or from the next generation of young directors."

As much a creative method as it is a business model, Borderline’s filmmaking process has resulted in some of the most innovative and artful movies in recent years, garnering a slew of awards and nominations. (Among them, JAMES WHITE took home the Sundance Next Audience Award last year, Sean Durkin was awarded Best Director for MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE at Sundance in 2011, and AFTERSCHOOL was nominated for Best First Feature at the 2008 Independent Spirit Awards).

Since meeting at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, Mond, Durkin, and Campos have continued to work together closely, rotating roles as writer, director, and producer. Showing no signs of slowing down, Borderline's most recent feature, CHRISTINE, directed by Antonio Campos and executive produced by Sean Durkin and Josh Mond, will have its world premier at this year's Sundance Film Festival. Based on the true story of a news reporter in Sarasota, Florida who took her own life on camera in the 1970s, CHRISTINE stars Rebecca Hall and Michael C. Hall.

The first official project from Borderline Presents is Nicolas Pesce’s debut feature, THE EYES OF MY MOTHER, also premiering at the upcoming Sundance Film Festival in the Next section. Shot in crisp black and white, the film is a highly stylized mood piece exploring the dark obsessions of a lonely young woman in the wake of a tragedy in the countryside. Pesce presented the concept for his film to Josh Mond while working on JAMES WHITE and Borderline Presents grew naturally from the collaboration, with Borderline overseeing the production from the development process through to post-production. THE EYES OF MY MOTHER was produced by Jacob Wasserman, Schulyer Weiss, and Max Born.



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Tuesday, January 19, 2016

THE WESTERNER -- Movie Review by Porfle



Several filmmakers have tried their hand at bringing the legendary Judge Roy Bean to the screen, with such familiar faces as Paul Newman, Ned Beatty, Edgar Buchanan, Victory Jory, and Jack Palance tackling the role on the big and small screens. 

With THE WESTERNER (1940), director William Wyler (THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES) gives us one of the most unusual takes on Bean in the form of a 46-year-old Walter Brennan, a brilliant character actor who plays the judge as a likably funny oddball one moment, a dangerous and unpredictable sociopath the next. 

Brennan's Roy Bean has set himself up as a fake judge whose courthouse is his own saloon with a jury pool made up of drunken, poker-playing cattlemen.  All of them are at war with the homesteaders in the area who fence off the range for their crops, a crime Bean often punishes with hanging.  Into this volatile culture clash rides Cole Harden (Gary Cooper), a saddle bum accused of horse theft who only escapes the hangman's noose by pretending to be a friend of Bean's most fervent fantasy woman, famed British beauty Lily Langtry. 


With the promise of a lock of Langtry's hair--which he, of course, doesn't have--Cole not only cheats death but becomes an unlikely friend to the wildly unstable Bean.  But his allegiances are mixed when he also befriends a spirited young farm woman named Jane Ellen (Doris Davenport) who lives with her father and takes the lead in trying to rally her fellow homesteaders against the often bloody onslaught of the cattlemen. 

Naturally, romance blossoms between Cole and Jane Ellen, one which will be shaken when she believes him to have betrayed her trust after a particularly vicious attack leaves the fields of corn aflame and most of the farmers fleeing in defeat.  Cole's only choice at that point is to use his friendship with Bean against him, setting him up for a showdown that will end in death for one or both of them.

As a counterpoint to Brennan's comical yet cruelty-tinged role--which won him an Oscar--the boyishly handsome Gary Cooper is at his laconic, likable "aw, shucks" best as the kindhearted drifter who won't suffer an insult but feels compelled to champion the farmers' almost hopeless cause (as SHANE will do years later, along with countless other heroic Western loners). 


He has a childlike way about him at times and his scenes with his leading lady are playful, notably when Cole is trying to talk Jane Ellen out of a lock of hair to present to Bean as belonging to Miss Langtry.  The more dramatic turns between the two later on are less convincing, however, lacking their earlier chemistry--a happily-ever-after epilogue seems tacked on, and the film never reaches the emotional highpoints between these two characters that it makes a cursory effort to achieve.

Before that, though, comes the exciting climactic scene which, rather than the battle between the two warring camps that we expect, is an odd episode in which Bean's obsession with Langtry lures him into a final showdown with Cole.  The sequence is a novel one and is tinged with melancholy as we feel a conflicting sympathy for Brennan's otherwise rather monstrous character. 

With its beautiful black-and-white cinematography by Gregg Toland (CITIZEN KANE), THE WESTERNER is an appealingly old-fashioned Western with the kind of period authenticity and genuine-ness that sets it apart from the slicker, more modern examples of the genre.  There are a number of comic touches and a general lighthearted air that keeps things from getting too grim amidst all the shootings and hangings, tempered by a gradual note of melancholy in the relationship between Cole and Bean.


Unfortunately, we never really get to know the farmers enough to care about them, and the ranchers, including a young Chill Wills, are cartoon characters.  (Very young versions of Forrest Tucker and Dana Andrews are on hand as well.)  The fact that it's quirky enough to set it apart from run-of-the-mill Westerns with similar plots makes THE WESTERNER as watchable as it is, along with Brennan's Looney Tunes performance and Gary Cooper's endless, irresistible charm.




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"OLD 37" Announces National Television Premiere On Chiller - This Friday Jan. 22nd @ 9PM



OLD 37
Announces National Television
Premiere On Chiller

This Friday, January 22 At 9PM EST

Now Available For Purchase On DVD
At Over 2,400 Walmart Locations Nationwide
& Video On Demand


Read our review HERE

January 19th, 2016 - OLD 37 is thrilled to announce its national television debut! After successfully screening at several notable film festivals (ComicCon's Horror Fest, Horror Hound, Rock And Shock, etc.) as well as premiering in select theaters across the country, the indie-horror flick is ready to invade your living room screens! The film will broadcast on Chiller on Friday, January 22nd at 9pm EST. Mark your calendars and grab your popcorn -- don't miss your chance to see a group of careless, car obsessed millennials get tormented by two psychotic brothers searching for their mother's hit and run killers while they pose as paramedics who intercept 9-1-1 calls in a beat up old ambulance. For more information and to watch the official trailer, please visit: www.old37themovie.com.

Dubbed as new and noteworthy on iTunes, indie-horror film OLD 37 is officially available for purchase on DVD (via Epic Pictures & Anchor Bay Canada). Thrill-seekers can pick up a personal copy in-store at over 2,400 Wal-Mart locations across the US! Alternatively, the film can be purchased on demand via Dish, Verizon Fios, Charter, Sudden Link, Media Com and many more to come! OLD 37 is also available to stream via iTunes (New & Noteworthy), Amazon Instant, Google Play (Top Horror Releases), Vudu, Vimeo, FlixFling, Xbox,and Playstation.

OLD 37 is the last ambulance ride you'll ever take. The film takes you on a journey through the lives of careless selfish teens (Brandi Cyrus, Olivia Alexander + more) and how two psychotic brothers (Kane Hodder + Bill Moseley) intercept emergency calls in their father's old ambulance to perform their own heinous medical procedures. The two worlds collide. When a shy girl-next-door becomes their latest target, she turns the tables on her captors to fight for her survival. Fast paced and blood soaked, OLD 37 taps into the most basic human fear, vulnerability. The words "don't worry I'm a paramedic" will make you think twice before dialing 9-1-1.

Fans can take their first look into the film by watching the official trailer now, here: http://bit.ly/OLD37_Trailer.

Featured by Fangoria, MTV, The Insider, J14 Magazine, DreadCentral, BloodyDisgusting, IHorror, HorrorHound and more, the film is packed with an all-star cast including Brandi Cyrus (Hannah Montana, Zoey 101), Caitlin Harris (The Secret Life of the American Teenager), Olivia Alexander (Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader, Killer Eye), Maxwell Zagorski, Maggie Williams (Audition), Ben Schneider, Mindy White (States, Lydia), Sascha Knopf (Shallow Hal, Expiration Date), Ken Simmons (Kick Ass), and more.
 
OLD 37 was written and produced by Paul Travers, stemming from a nightmare he had. With music composed by Darius Holbert (Hobo With A Shotgun, World's Greatest Dad, Cedar Rapids), and blood, guts and scares provided by Brian Spears and Pete Gerner (We Are What We Are, Late Phases, VHS), this team is bringing the sirens

For more information on OLD 37, please visit:

Website: www.OLD37TheMovie.com
Facebook: www.Facebook.com/OLD37themovie
Twitter: www.Twitter.com/OLD37MOVIE
Merch Store: http://old37.bigcartel.com/

Chiller, currently available in over 40 million homes, is the only cable channel devoted to delivering viewers round-the-clock scares. Chiller's eclectic slate of adrenaline-fueled, soul-stirring entertainment includes a broad offering of films, including feature length premieres every Friday, international programming, documentary and reality shows (Fear Factor), anthology series (The Twilight Zone), specials (Can You Survive a Horror Movie? and the ongoing "Chiller 13" countdown specials), classic series (Tales From the Darkside, The Outer Limits) and some of the most thought-provoking, suspenseful contemporary series that have aired in recent years (Pushing Daisies, Dead Like Me).

Read our review of OLD 37


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"NEIGHBORS 2: SORORITY RISING" With Seth Rogan and Chloë Grace Moretz Coming May 13th



Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising
Release: 05/13/2016


Returning stars Seth Rogen, Zac Efron and Rose Byrne are joined by Chloë Grace Moretz for Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, the follow-up to 2014’s most popular original comedy. Nicholas Stoller again directs in a film that follows what happens when the will of parenthood goes against the bonds of sisterhood.

Now that Mac (Rogen) and Kelly Radner (Byrne) have a second baby on the way, they are ready to make the final move into adulthood: the suburbs. But just as they thought they’d reclaimed the neighborhood and were safe to sell, they learn that the new occupants next door are a sorority even more out of control than Teddy (Efron) and his brothers ever dreamed of being.

Tired of their school’s sexist, restrictive system, the unorthodox ladies of Kappa Nu have decided to start a house where they can do whatever the hell they want. When Shelby (Moretz) and her sisters, Beth (Kiersey Clemons) and Nora (Beanie Feldstein), find the perfect place just off campus, they won’t let the fact that it’s located on a quiet street stand in their way of parties as epic as the guys throw.

Forced to turn to the one ex-neighbor with the skills to bring down the new Greeks next door, the Radners—alongside best friends Jimmy (Ike Barinholtz) and Paula (Carla Gallo)—bring in charismatic Teddy as their secret weapon. If he can infiltrate the sorority and charm his way through it, the thirtysomethings will shutter the Kappas’ home. But if they think that their neighbors are going down without a fight, they have severely underestimated the power of youthful ingenuity and straight-up crazy. www.neighbors-movie.com

Genre
Comedy

Starring
Seth Rogen, Zac Efron, Rose Byrne, Chloë Grace Moretz, Dave Franco, Ike Barinholtz, Carla Gallo, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Kiersey Clemons, Beanie Feldstein, Selena Gomez and Lisa Kudrow

Directed By
Nicholas Stoller

Produced By
Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg, James Weaver

Executive Produced By
Andrew Jay Cohen, Brendan O’Brien, Nathan Kahane, Joe Drake



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Ruth Wilson To Star In Osgood Perkins' “I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE”



RUTH WILSON TO STAR IN OSGOOD PERKINS'
“I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE”

Bob Balaban and Lucy Boynton will round out the Cast with Principal Photography Beginning in Ottawa February 16


LOS ANGELES -- (January 19, 2016) – Golden Globe® Winner Ruth Wilson (“The Affair,” Saving Mr. Banks) will star in Osgood Perkins’ I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House, with Academy Award® Nominee Bob Balaban (The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom) and Lucy Boynton (February, Miss Potter) also joining the cast. Perkins wrote the script and will be directing, with principal photography beginning in Ottawa on February 16th.

I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House follows Lily (Wilson), a young nurse hired to care for elderly Helen Bloom, a best-selling author of ghost stories who has chosen to live out her final days in her beloved country home – a home that holds an horrific ghost story of its own.

Rob Paris’ Paris Film, Inc. is producing and co-financing the film through the recently announced venture with Robert Menzies’s Ottawa-based production shingle Zed Filmworks, and Canadian real estate developer Alphonse Ghossein’s Go Insane Films.  Paris and Menzies are producing and Ghossein is executive producing.

I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House marks Perkins’ second project with Paris Film, Inc., Zed Filmworks and Go Insane Films following their successful collaboration on February, directed by Perkins and starring Emma Roberts, Kiernan Shipka and Lucy Boyton, which was acquired in the U.S. by A24 after it premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Wilson is represented by CAA and Untitled, Balaban by Paradigm and Boynton by Innovative Artists. Perkins is represented by CAA.

Los Angeles-based Paris Film, Inc. and Zed Filmworks recently joined forces in a partnership with Go Insane Films to co-finance and produce a slate of 5 films over the first 2 years with production based in Ottawa.  I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House is the third project to be announced under the deal.  Other projects include: Chris Eigeman’s Trinity, which tracks the harrowing and life-changing experience of two brilliant young physicists recruited in 1943 from Columbia University to help build the first atomic bomb at Los Alamos; and Zak Hilditch’s Numbskull, which tells the story of internet sensation Billy “The Kid” O’Connor who must reconcile the extreme exploits that brought him fame and fortune while driving away his wife and daughter.



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